September Gardening Calendar

Sunny days still bring the heat, but cooler nights hint of things to come. It’s time to dig out your gardening tools!

PLANT

Plant citrus while the weather is still warm. Choose varieties that are better adapted to desert conditions.

Plant strawberry varieties that perform in low-desert conditions. Choose a location that has protection from afternoon sun.

Plant fall herbs such as chives, thyme, catmint, cilantro, cumin, dill, fennel and parsley.

Transplant herbs such as lemongrass, marjoram, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage and thyme.

PREPARE

Dig compost into vegetable beds. Rearrange container plants to sunnier locations as the sun’s arc slips southward.

Chill tulip, crocus, daffodil and hyacinth bulbs in the refrigerator for eight weeks prior to planting.

PRUNE

Cut back tomatoes and peppers that made it through the summer to promote a new bloom before frost.

Trim roses and remove dead twigs to promote a second bloom in the fall.

Prune shrubs such as oleander, privet, xylosma, Texas ranger and Arizona rosewood that have become overgrown.

 

 

 

WATER

Cut back on water for deciduous fruit trees, grape vines and citrus to slow growth and get ready for cooler temperatures.

Water citrus deeply out to the plant’s canopy every two weeks.

 

MAINTAIN

Hose off dusty plants to control spider mites.

Divide iris this month. Dig up large clumps and cut rhizomes into small pieces.

Pull and compost the last of the summer annuals.

Refresh garden beds by incorporating four to six inches of organic matter. FERTILIZE

Fertilize with nitrogen in early September to provide nutrients to summer-stressed plants. Water the day before and after applications to prevent burn.

Feed roses with a slow-release fertilizer that will last through fall. Fertilize citrus with the third and final application of nitrogen for the year.

Add organic nitrogen sources to the soil, including alfalfa meal, blood meal, coffee grounds, cottonseed meal, fish emulsion and guano.

TIP OF THE MONTH

Chile peppers are available in many colors, shapes, sizes and degrees of heat. The key factor affecting how fruit set is night temperature, which ideally should be between 65 and 80 degree. Bell pepper varieties do not set fruit when temperatures are over 90 degrees, but may begin to do so once the weather is cooler. If bell-type peppers are desired, consider the smaller pod “Carmen Sweet Pepper.”

Chiles need six hours or more of sunlight. Provide full sun in the morning and 50 percent afternoon shade. In the fall, fewer blossoms will appear as the weather turns cooler.

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Tucson, AZ 85715

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