Category: Uncategorized

Top Dentists

Selection Process (Methodology)

“If you had a patient in need of a dentist, which dentist would you refer them to?”

This is the question we’ve asked thousands of dentists to help us determine who the topDentists should be. Dentists and specialists are asked to take into consideration years of experience, continuing education, manner with patients, use of new techniques and technologies and of course physical results. The nomination pool of dentists consists of dentists listed online with the American Dental Association, as well as dentists listed online with their local dental societies, thus allowing virtually every dentist the opportunity to participate. Dentists are also given the opportunity to nominate other dentists that they feel should be included in our list. Respondents are asked to put aside any personal bias or political motivations and to use only their knowledge of their peer’s work when evaluating the other nominees. Voters are asked to individually evaluate the practitioners on their ballot whose work they are familiar with. Once the balloting is completed, the scores are compiled and then averaged. The numerical average required for inclusion varies depending on the average for all the nominees within the specialty and the geographic area. Borderline cases are given a careful consideration by the editors. Voting characteristics and comments are taken into consideration while making decisions. Past awards a dentist has received, and status in various dental academies can play a factor in our decision. Once the decisions have been finalized, the included dentists are checked against state dental boards for disciplinary actions to make sure they have an active license and are in good standing with the board. Then letters of congratulations are sent to all the listed dentists. Of course there are many fine dentists who are not included in this representative list. It is intended as a sampling of the great body of talent in the field of dentistry in the United States. A dentist’s inclusion on our list is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow dentists. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, we remain confident that our polling methodology largely corrects for any biases and that these lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate, and useful list of dentists available anywhere.

Who compiles the list? topDentists, LLC, based in Augusta, Georgia, has compiled a nationwide list of top-rated dentists. Do dentists pay to be on the list?

How many dentists in the immediate Tucson area are on the list? 126 How is the list determined? Read on …

Endodontics

Endodontics

Tung B. Bui
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

David G. Burros
Southern Arizona Endodontics
7493 North Oracle Road, Suite 217 Tucson, AZ 85704
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Christopher Douville
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Daniel B. Funk
Southern Arizona Endodontics
7493 North Oracle Road, Suite 217 Tucson, AZ 85704
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Dean M. Hauseman III
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Paul G. Hobeich
Hobeich Endodontics
6600 North Oracle Road, Suite 110 Tucson, AZ 85704
520-209-2600
www.hobeichendo.com

John R. Hughes
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Justin S. Hughes
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Jeffery Keippel
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Thomas R. Kramkowski
Southern Arizona Endodontics
1011 North Craycroft Road, Suite 107 Tucson, AZ 85711
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

Oscar M. Pena
OMP Endodontics
1605 East River Road, Suite 151 Tucson, AZ 85718
520-299-6662
www.ompendo.com

John P. Smith
Southern Arizona Endodontics
7493 North Oracle Road, Suite 217 Tucson, AZ 85704
520-322-0800
www.saendo.com

General Dentistry

General Dentistry

Michael D. Allen Sabino Hills Family Dentistry 9155 East Tanque Verde Road, Suite 127 Tucson, AZ 85749 520-760-6044 www.familytucsondentist.com

Lenny W. Arias 5575 East River Road, Suite 171 Tucson, AZ 85750 520-299-5122 www.sabinodental.com

Robert Z. Badalov 801 North Wilmot Road, Suite G Tucson, AZ 85711 520-745-0321 www.drrobertbadalov.com

Jacqueline R. Bennett The Art of Dentistry 1200 North El Dorado Place, Suite C-320 Tucson, AZ 85715 520-886-3303 www.bennettdds.com

Roger C. Biede II 1238 West Orange Grove Road, Suite 102 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-797-1240 www.rogerbiededds.com

Robert C. Brei 4820 East Camp Lowell Drive Tucson, AZ 85712 520-325-9000 www.drbrei.com

James K. Brimhall Brimhall Family Dentistry 2300 North Craycroft Road, Suite 2 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-1220 www.Ilovemydentaloffice.com

R. Anthony Burrows Desert Springs Family Dentistry 7320 North La Cholla Boulevard, Suite 134 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-575-5900 www.desertspringsfamilydentistry.com

Anthony C. Caputo Southwest Dental Anesthesia Services 4723 East Camp Lowell Drive Tucson, AZ 85712 520-571-7951 www.southwestdentalanesthesia.com

Alexa Carrara Campbell Dental Group 3320 North Campbell Avenue, Suite 100 Tucson, AZ 85719 520-322-0600 www.campbellavedental.com

Annette Carrillo 2680 East Valencia Road, Suite 130 Tucson, AZ 85706 520-889-2747

John R. Carson 7415 East Tanque Verde Road Tucson, AZ 85715 520-514-7203 www.johnrcarsondds.com

A. Jay Citrin 5601 North Oracle Road, Suite 121 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-887-8771 www.drjaycitrin.com

Robert H. Collier 6650 North Oracle Road, Suite 120 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-297-7263 www.collierdentistry.com

Luis A. Cueva, Jr. TMJ Disorders Orofacial Pain Center 850 North Kolb Road Tucson, AZ 85710 520-298-9186 www.jaw-pain.net

William H. Daggett 4676 East Fifth Street Tucson, AZ 85711 520-323-1462

Adam R. Dalesandro Derickson & Dalesandro 762 North Country Club Road Tucson, AZ 85716 520-327-5993 www.drderickson.com

Deron M. Davenport Davenport & Davenport Dental Practice 2300 North Craycroft Road, Suite 3 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-886-2546 www.davenportdds.com

Richard C. Davis 2777 North Campbell Avenue, Suite A Tucson, AZ 85719 520-795-9202 www.richarddavisdds.com

John A. Dehnert Dehnert Dental 3945 East Fort Lowell Road, Suite 209 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-628-2818 www.dehnertdental.com

Jeffrey C. Derickson Derickson & Dalesandro 762 North Country Club Road Tucson, AZ 85716 520-327-5993 www.drderickson.com

Norman P. Don Riverwalk Dental 4015 East Paradise Falls Drive, Suite 129 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-795-1316 www.riverwalkdental.net

Phillip W. Don, Jr. 4725 East Camp Lowell Drive Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-5301 www.phillipdondds.com

Jesse Engle Presidio Dental 8740 North Thornydale Road, Suite 100 Tucson, AZ 85742 520-744-7388 www.presidiodental.com

James M. Flynn Flynn Dentistry 12470 North Rancho Vistoso Boulevard, Suite 100 Oro Valley, AZ 85755 520-575-9449 www.flynndentistry.net

Bryan R. Foulk Foulk Famiily Dentistry 7229 North Thornydale Road, Suite 149 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-744-3480 www.foulkdental.com

Sandra W. Gibson Gibson Dental 5445 North Kolb Road, Suite 205 Tucson, AZ 85750 520-577-7667 www.doctorgibson.com

Christopher M. Granillo 2300 North Craycroft Road, Suite 6 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-298-5556 www.granillodentistry.com

Michael A. Grossman Grossman Dental Health 6246 East Pima Street, Suite 100 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-5577 www.grossmandentalhealth.com

R. Todd Haft Northridge Dental 16215 North Oracle Road Tucson, AZ 85739 520-825-2195 www.northridgedentalaz.com

Kevin R. Haley Cañada Hills Dental 10325 North La Cañada Drive, Suite 181 Tucson, AZ 85737 520-877-3234 www.canadahillsdental.com

Kathrine Hammel Hammel Dentistry 6026 East Grant Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-647-2888 www.hammeldentistry.com

Eric C. Hardy Dental Care on Golf Links 8975 East Golf Links Road Tucson, AZ 85730 520-886-6054 www.dcgl.org

Sonia S. Hariri Craycroft Dental Care 1840 North Craycroft Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-886-2822 www.shariridds.com

Hurley R. Harrell 2710 North Campbell Avenue Tucson, AZ 85719 520-795-2882 www.harrelldent.com

Robert F. Hawke 1575 North Swan Road, Suite 200 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-441-2004 www.drhawke.com

Jess Haymore 1830 East Innovation Park Drive Oro Valley, AZ 85755 520-297-2514 www.innovationdentalov.com

Robert P. Hohenstein Hohenstein & Schwartz 2512 East Vistoso Commerce Loop Road Oro Valley, AZ 85755 520-797-4844 www.hsdentistry.com

Jared J. Kahl Dental Care on Golf Links 8975 East Golf Links Road Tucson, AZ 85730 520-886-6054 www.dentalcaretucson.com

F. Timothy Leong Bear Canyon Dentistry 8878 East Tanque Verde Road Tucson, AZ 85749 520-749-1230 www.bearcanyondentistry.com

Jeffery L. Martin Martin – Taylor Dentistry 7350 East Speedway Boulevard, Suite 201 Tucson, AZ 85711 520-747-9024 www.Martin-TaylorDentistry.com

Shawn M. McFarland 6828 East Broadway Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85710 520-296-8549 www.dentistsintucson.com

Carol A. McGonigle 1802 East Prince Road Tucson, AZ 85719 520-323-3186 www.carolmcgonigle.com

LeeAat Mednick Dehnert Dental 3945 East Fort Lowell Road, Suite 209 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-628-2818 www.dehnertdental.com

Jennifer Mohr Mohr Smiles 1101 North Wilmot Road, Suite 213 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-290-8900 www.mohrsmilestucson.com

Nicholas G. Mooberry 151 Dental Care 151 West Speedway Blvd Tucson, AZ 85705 520-623-2733 www.melvindixondds.com

Philip C. Mooberry Mooberry Dentistry 1757 North Swan Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-795-7733 www.mooberrydentistry.com

Debra A. Oro Oro Dental Medicine 10425 North Oracle Road, Suite 125 Oro Valley, AZ 85737 520-297-2227 www.orodental.com

Robert J. Oro Oro Dental Medicine 10425 North Oracle Road, Suite 125 Oro Valley, AZ 85737 520-297-2227 www.orodental.com

Sharad N. Pandhi 5828 North Oracle Road, Suite 100 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-293-2166 www.smileperfectionaz.com

Adam R. Pershing 2300 North Craycroft Road, Suite 4 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-722-2992 www.adamrpershingdmd.com

Michelle Romero-Chavez Pusch Ridge Dental 180 West Magee Road, Suite 158 Oro Valley, AZ 85704 520-742-0830 www.puschridgedental.com

John H. Rosenberg, Jr. Hillside Dental 7241 North Thornydale Road Tucson, AZ 85741 520-744-0700 www.cosmeticdentisttucson.com

Kevin M. Schmidtke Schmidtke Dentistry 7476 North La Cholla Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85741 520-297-2727 www.kevinschmidtkedentistry.com

Gregory S. Schwartz Hohenstein & Schwartz 2512 East Vistoso Commerce Loop Road Oro Valley, AZ 85755 520-797-4844 www.hsdentistry.com

Paul V. Spaeth 2165 West Orange Grove Road Tucson, AZ 85741 520-575-8800

David G. Spalding 7518 North La Cholla Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85741 520-887-4510

Anne E. Stolcis Adobe Dentistry 1640 North Country Club Road Tucson, AZ 85716 520-323-9327 www.adobedentistry.com

Athena C. Storey Studio Dental 10550 North La Cañada Drive, Suite 106 Oro Valley, AZ 85737 520-575-5576 www.studiodentalaz.com

William H. Taylor Martin – Taylor Dentistry 7350 East Speedway Boulevard, Suite 201 Tucson, AZ 85710 520-747-9024 www.martintaylordentistry.com

Cory S. Wertz El Rio Health Center 1500 West Commerce Court Tucson, AZ 95746 520-670-3758

Timothy G. Wilson 1751 West Orange Grove Road, Building 2 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-797-8030 www.timwilsondentistry.com

Elahe Wissinger E Dental Solutions 2504 East River Road Tucson, AZ 85718 520-745-5496 www.edentalsolutions.net

John SooHyong Yu SmileMore Dental 12162 North Rancho Vistoso Boulevard, Suite 140 Oro Valley, AZ 85755 520-531-8207 www.smilemoredentalaz.com

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Angelle M. Casagrande Associates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 3150 North Swan Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-6531 www.sazoms.com

Nicholas J. Coles Arizona Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons 7455 East Tanque Verde Road Tucson, AZ 85715 520-745-2454 www.azoms.com

Jerome S. Holbrook Tucson Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 1200 North El Dorado Place, Suite E-510 Tucson, AZ 85715 520-398-4453 www.tucsonoralsurgery.com

Caroline M. Kacer Casas Adobes Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 6471 North La Cholla Boulevard, Suite 101 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-742-6136 www.caosaz.com

Owen W. Kaiser 10325 North La Canada, Suite 181 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-742-6136 www.canadahillsdental.com

Daniel J. Klemmedson Associates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 3150 North Swan Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-6531 www.sazoms.com

Timothy A. Lew Associates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 3150 North Swan Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-6531 www.sazoms.com

Derek Miller Associates in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 3150 North Swan Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-745-6531 www.sazoms.com

Ronald C. Quintia Southern Arizona Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 6369 East Tanque Verde Road, Suite 230 Tucson, AZ 85715 520-290-6800 www.drquintia.com

Negin Saghafi Arizona Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons 7455 East Tanque Verde Road Tucson, AZ 85715 520-745-2454 www.azoms.com

John M. Schmidt Casas Adobes Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 6471 North La Cholla Boulevard, Suite 101 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-742-6136 www.caosaz.com

Robert S. Wood Arizona Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 7455 East Tanque Verde Road Tucson, AZ 85715 520-745-2454 www.azoms.com

Orthodontics

Orthodontics

Thomas M. Blase Blase Orthodontics 6373 East Tanque Verde Road, Suite 110 Tucson, AZ 85715 520-296-1700 www.blasebraces.com

Anthony F. Delio Delio Orthodontics 3601 West Cortaro Farms Road, Suite 101 Tucson, AZ 85742 520-572-4244 www.delioorthodontics.com

Lindsay L. Don Davis Pediatric Dentistry 716 North Country Club Road Tucson, AZ 85716 520-326-8516 www.tucsonkidsdentist.com

Larissa E. Freytag Grinz Orthodontics 7488 North La Cholla Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85714 520-297-7575 www.grinzortho.com

Andrew L. Kassman Kassman 3D Orthodontics 6700 North Oracle Road, Suite 327 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-582-9698 www.drkassman.com

Eric J. Leber Leber Orthodontics 1647 North Alvernon Way, Suite 2 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-795-2323 www.leberortho.com

Matthew F. Linaker Linaker Orthodontics 8070 North Oracle Road Tucson, AZ 85704 520-531-1496 www.linakerorthodontics.com

Daniel E. Pearcy Orthodontic Specialists of Tucson 1320 West Ina Road Tucson, AZ 85704 520-742-1232 www.supersmilz.com

Yone V. Ponce Friendly Smiles Orthodontics 1601 North Tucson Boulevard, Suite 8 Tucson, AZ 85716 520-326-1101 www.friendlysmilesortho.com

Kyle S. Rabe Dr. Jaw Orthodontists 5747 East Fifth Street Tucson, AZ 85711 520-369-4491 www.drjaw.net

Mittida Raksanaves Orthodontic Specialists of Tucson 1320 West Ina Road Tucson, AZ 85704 520-742-1232 www.supersmilz.com

Laura Robison-Rabe Dr. Jaw Orthodontists 5747 East Fifth Street Tucson, AZ 85711 520-747-5297 www.drjaw.net

Andrew T. Rosen 1865 North Kolb Road Tucson, AZ 85715 520-290-0500 www.bracesbydrdrew.com

James A. Weaver Dr. Jaw Orthodontics 5747 East Fifth Street Tucson, AZ 85711 520-747-5297 www.drjaw.net

Pediatric Dentistry

Pediatric Dentistry

Priya Y. Abramian Tucson Smiles Pediatric Dentistry 5920 North La Cholla Boulevard, Suite 110 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-544-4171 www.tucsonsmilesaz.com

Norman J. Bunch Northwest Children’s Dentistry 7610 North La Cholla Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85741 520-544-8522 www.nwkidsdds.com

Adam Davis Davis Pediatric Dentistry 750 East Pusch View Lane, Suite 150 Oro Valley, AZ 85737 520-365-1118 www.tucsonkidsdentist.com

Charles “Chad” Davis, Jr. Davis Pediatric Dentisty 716 North Country Club Road Tucson, AZ 85716 520-326-8516 www.tucsonkidsdentist.com

Charles A. Davis, Sr. Davis Pediatric Dentisty 716 North Country Club Road Tucson, AZ 85716 520-326-8516 www.tucsonkidsdentist.com

Laila B. Hishaw Tucson Smiles Pediatric Dentistry 5920 North La Cholla Boulevard, Suite 110 Tucson, AZ 85741 520-544-4171 www.tucsonsmilesaz.com

Lauren Hobeich Davis Pediatric Dentistry 4566 North 1st Avenue, Suite 150 Tucson, AZ 85718 520-742-4118 www.tucsonkidsdentist.com

Michael LaCorte 8351 North Oracle Road Tucson, AZ 85704 520-297-5900 www.drlacorte.com

Kedar S. Lele Great Grins Children’s Dentistry 3953 East Paradise Falls Drive, Suite 110 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-325-4746 www.greatgrinsdds.com

Jennifer J. Marshall Northwest Children’s Dentistry 7610 North La Cholla Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85741 520-544-8522 www.nwkidsdds.com

Angela Wolfman Great Grins Children’s Dentistry 3953 East Paradise Falls Drive, Suite 110 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-325-4746 www.greatgrinschildrensdentistry.com

Andrew S. Zale El Rio Community Health Center 1500 West Commerce Court, Building 1 Tucson, AZ 85746 520-670-3909 www.elrio.org

Periodontics

Periodontics

Graig D. Brown 3148 North Swan Road Tucson, AZ 85712 520-790-2151 www.perioaz.com

Wayne K. Goodner 1751 West Orange Grove Road, Suite 101 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-742-4227 www.drgoodner.com

Brien V. Harvey 899 North Wilmot Road, Suite E2 Tucson, AZ 85711 520-745-5722 www.drharvey.info

James R. Knochel 801 North Wilmot Road, Suite E1 Tucson, AZ 85711 520-747-7944 www.knocheldds.com

Lisa A. Lear 6367 East Tanque Verde Road, Suite 210 Tucson, AZ 85715 520-577-3935 www.leardentalimplants.com

Clark R. Mackelprang Tucson Dental Implants & Periodontics 2330 North Rosemont Boulevard, Suite A Tucson, AZ 85712 520-327-0263 www.gumsandimplants.com

Jared D. Roberts 1751 West Orange Grove Road, Suite 101 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-742-4227 www.drgoodner.com

Clyde M. Robinson III Tucson Dental Implants & Periodontics 2330 North Rosemont Boulevard, Unit A Tucson, AZ 85712 520-327-0263 www.gumsandimplants.com

Prosthodontics

Prosthodontics

Ryan C. Farnum Arizona Prosthodontics 7556 North La Cholla Boulevard Tucson, AZ 85741 520-323-2900 www.drfarnum.com

E. Karina Keys Catalina Dental 8315 North Oracle Road, Suite 101 Oro Valley, AZ 85704 520-825-9305 www.catalinadental.com

Howard M. Steinberg 2385 North Ferguson Avenue, Suite 111 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-886-3030 www.tucsonsmile.com TL

Howard M. Steinberg 2385 North Ferguson Avenue, Suite 111 Tucson, AZ 85712 520-886-3030 www.tucsonsmile.com TL

DISCLAIMER This list is excerpted from 2018 the topDentists™ list, which includes listings for 126 dentists and specialists in the Tucson Area. For more information call 706-364-0853; write P.O. Box 970, Augusta, GA 30903; email info@usatopdentists. com or visit www.usatopdentists.com. topDentists has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. Copyright 2018 by topDentists, Augusta, GA. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without permission of topDentists. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

A Day In The Life Of An EMT

On TV and in the movies, EMTs are usually portrayed at the most dramatic moments in their jobs. But what is a shift really like for a firefighter/emergency medical technician?

We turned to the Tucson Fire Department to find out.

By Elena Acoba  |  Photography by Shelley Welander

This article follows a shift with Firefighter/Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Cam Welander.

In 2017, the Tucson Fire Department dispatched medical emergency responders 72,138 times. That accounted for 78 percent of more than 92,000 emergency calls to the department.

All TFD firefighters get 150 to 190 hours of training as EMTs. They learn how to assess medical and trauma issues, take vital signs and provide basic life support (BLS) such as emergency wound and trauma care and giving oxygen and some medications.

Paramedics take at least 1,000 hours of training, including classes in anatomy and physiology. That allows them to provide advanced life support (ALS), including using a heart monitor, administering multiple medications, performing advanced airway procedures and transporting patients to hospital emergency rooms.

Sometimes EMTs will perform the same treatments as paramedics in extreme circumstances when a paramedic isn’t available, such as in rural areas.

One shift with firefighter/emergency medical technician (EMT) Cam Welander early this year showed the variety of calls that require medical help, from true emergencies to non-critical first-aid advice.

Welander’s day at Station 4 near Grant Road and Interstate 10 starts with station upkeep and exercising. Two hours later he responds to the first call of the day: A man who fainted in a doctor’s office.

He and two other firefighters take the ladder truck to the office, lights and sirens on. The older man with several chronic health issues is conscious when the crew arrives. Using their own equipment, the firefighters determine that his blood pressure and pulse are normal, both as he is seated and when he stands up.

Asked what he’d like to do, the patient opts to go home. The firefighters caution him to seek medical help if he continues to feel bad.

Welander, who has logged 12 years as a firefighter, puts in an 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. “work” day to train, keep up on professional news, read and act on memos, drill and maintain the station and equipment. Although every firefighter is an EMT, Welander is designated at his station to make sure that stores are stocked with medical supplies and that medical emergency equipment is functioning.

A mid-afternoon call sends him, the rest of the ladder crew and the paramedic truck with two more firefighters to check on an unresponsive woman. They find an underweight 30-year-old breathing at a rate of six breaths per minute — the normal is 12 to 18 — with an elevated pulse and low blood oxygen.

They administer oxygen and help with ventilation using a bag-valve mask, also called a manual resuscitator, which is enough for her to “sort of” come to, Welander says.

“She didn’t look healthy. She was super skinny,” he adds. “The whole way she presented herself, she ended up being transported in advanced life support with the medics.” That means a ride to the hospital emergency room. On the way, information about the woman’s condition is transmitted to the ER by computer to prepare hospital staff for her arrival.

Medical emergency responders are guided by directives issued by Dr. Terrence Valenzuela, an emergency room physician with Banner — University Medical Center Tucson who also serves as the TFD medical director.

Instead of getting on the radio to get direction from hospital ER personnel, “we function under what is called administrative guidelines,” says TFD Capt. Julian Herrera, who is in charge of medical administration. That saves time and it standardizes how responders handle calls.

Firefighters drill on these directives and use them to quickly assess each situation.

For the unconscious woman, the team checked multiple vital signs, including blood pressure, heart rate, pupils, gripping and skin elasticity. They noted the circumstances—in this case, the patient was lying down with low respiration rate — and took a quick medical history.

Sieminski, Welander and EMT Jake Connor take the blood pressure and temperature of Kristin, a TFD cadet.

“We trust our numbers and the way the patient is presenting,” says Welander. “Based on what we find, we have guidelines that specify whether the patient needs to be transported in an ALS or basic life support ambulance.”

After 5 p.m., Welander’s work day is over and after dinner it’s down time until a call comes in. And one does: a fall injury. Four firefighters are let in by a man to a disheveled apartment and find a woman on the floor. One of her legs is wrapped in a bloody elastic bandage. And she is drunk. “She’s laughing and joking and moving her leg around,” Welander says.

The responders learn that the woman fell down and heard a pop. As they examine the injury, they find indications of a compound fracture of her tibia and fibula, both of which are poking through her skin.

The crew calls for a paramedic unit, which helps with treatment and drives her to the hospital. Detail matters when calling 911 regarding a medical emergency. Because the call about the woman was for a fall injury with no more detail, EMTs were sent first to assess the situation. Had someone mentioned broken bones that broke skin, says Welander, a paramedic unit might have been called out first.

“The caller needs to describe the scene as accurately as possible,” says Herrera, “and the dispatcher will make a determination of who to send.”

Mental health calls are some of the most challenging because the emergency health system isn’t set up to handle them. It’s clear that someone who has overdosed or done physical harm needs to go to an ER.

“But if someone has high anxiety or is very angry, it’s not necessarily true that the emergency room would be able to give the most help,” Herrera says.

Paramedics can drive patients only to ERs, so a crisis center is an extra ride away.

“We don’t want to just leave (patients) where they are because they need help,” he says, “so the emergency room has always kind of been the fallback.”

Before Welander’s shift is over, he and his crew tends to a man whose bug bite five days earlier is still swollen, itchy and tender to the touch. The EMTs recommend he take a pain reliever, use an anti-bacterial cream and visit urgent care if it gets worse.

Welander says he “loves his job” as a Station 4 firefighter. It’s the home of TFD’s technical rescue technicians (TRT) team. It responds to complex situations such as structural collapse, swift-water rescue, automobile extraction, rope rescue and confined-space rescue.

Firefighters rely on their training as a well-oiled unit to handle these calls. “You feel like you’re part of a Super Bowl team,” Welander says. “Say you pull someone out of a mangled car. That’s an awesome feeling. It’s great anytime we go on a real call.”

But frequent calls from one location for issues that are not medical emergencies “wears on you,” he adds.

EMT Andy Amos, Sieminski and Welander carrying their equipment.

There are many stories of these types of calls: People who are homeless and want to get out of extreme weather; the poor who can’t afford to see a doctor or urgent care; the person who frequently calls 911 for non-emergencies.

Many 911 calls can’t be solved by emergency medicine: a drug addict who wants to get clean, an elderly woman who needs help with every-day tasks.

“Many times people call 911 because they are at a loss on what to do or how to solve their problem,” says Herrera.

This frequent over-use and abuse of 911 causes “compassion-fatigue” among firefighters, says Capt. Brian Thompson.

“It’s one of those things when you’ve seen the same person out in the field three or four times and they are not taking the steps needed to make progress,” says Thompson. “Our crews are feeling it.”

To help these frequent callers and reduce the number of non-emergency calls, TFD implemented a program designed by Assistant Chief Sharon McDonough. The Tucson Collaborative Community Care (TC-3) program started in January 2016. Thompson is its team manager.

Four firefighters in the program take referrals from field crews who feel a person could benefit from the program. It also takes referrals from a database that tracks frequent 911 callers.

A TFD crew had to rescue a man who had fallen in his bathroom, Thompson reports. The crew, seeing his home in major disrepair, referred his case to the TC-3 team. As the man recovered in a skilled nursing facility, he got a visit from the team, which discovered that he also didn’t have transportation to buy groceries.

The team called the non-profit Community Home Repair Projects of Arizona to fix the water heater and evaporative cooler. Workers also installed a new bathroom sink to replace the one damaged during the rescue. TC-3 also made arrangements for a grocery store to make home deliveries.

“When he returned home, things were much better than when he left,” Thompson says. “This gentleman has been able to enjoy his family home and a better quality of life.”

TC-3 works with many agencies such as Pima Council on Aging, El Rio Community Health Center, Interfaith Community Services, Salvation Army and Sister Jose, as well as private companies that offer home health, hospice care and other services. They help TC-3 coordinate care that will reduce emergencies and, subsequently, 911 calls.

“The city of Tucson has a wide range of valuable resources,” Thompson says. “TC-3 navigates these individuals to the appropriate resources that fit their needs. It is then that we see a reduction, if not a complete stop, to the 911 super-utilization.” 

In The Loop

Path, Present, Future!

What links 30 public parks, has nearly four-dozen pieces of public art and is likely only one mile from your house? It’s The Loop!

By Kirsten Almquist

Riders modeling Loop jerseys on a commercial shoot along the Rillito River.

If you’ve driven across a bridge spanning one of metropolitan Tucson’s major (frequently dry) rivers, chances are you’ve seen glimpses of a paved path that runs alongside the wash, bristling with cyclists, runners and folks walking dogs. This is Tucson’s not-so-hidden treasure and, after years of development, it’s finally finished. Each day as the sun begins to peek over the Rincon Mountains, outdoor enthusiasts make their way to some portion of this 131-mile multi-use path.

A dog-walker along the north side of the Rillito River Park path, a particularly scenic portion of Pima County’s The Loop.

Interestingly enough, recreation is not what first inspired the creation of “The Chuck Huckelberry Loop.” Pima County began building cement bank protection along the banks of the Rillito and Santa Cruz rivers after the mighty floods of 1983. What the city soon discovered was that nearby residents were using the unpaved maintenance access paths on top of the banks to walk their dogs, go for a run or ride their bikes.  That’s when inspiration hit.   

What started as a good idea, turned out to be a great idea. The county began creating river parks with paved trails. It didn’t take long for these parks to become widely popular. As the years passed, every time the county constructed new sections of embankment along major canals, they built more parks and multifunctional paths. One of the largest, finest and most popular public recreational trails in the country was being blazed right through the heart of Tucson.

On a regular basis, Pima County residents use The Loop as part of their commute and exercise routine. But locals aren’t the only ones taking advantage of this park-centered perk. Over the past decade, The Loop has become a major tourist attraction. Some visitors to Tucson may scratch their heads in confusion as they stare out at our dry riverbeds. However, come monsoon season, they’re shocked to see these parched veins flowing with water, and delighted by the soothing scent of the dampened creosote bushes as they traverse the many miles of pathways.

Rain or shine, for those keen on outdoor recreation, The Loop provides yet another reason to explore Tucson. In February, Pennsylvania residents Clay Shaw and Karen Mitchell made a five-day-long drive to the Old Pueblo in search of winter refuge and to bike outdoors on recently completed paths. “We wanted to get away from our winter woes and just spend a nice relaxing month in Tucson because we knew it was beautiful, having been here before,” says Mitchell. “The Loop is really well done. The signage made it easy to figure out where we were. I love the fact that you just follow the river and you don’t get off on a bad shoot.”

Jon Jegglie, a resident of Sierra Vista, discovered The Loop nearly three years ago. He makes it a point to use it on weekends when he and his wife are visiting. “My wife drops me at Thornydale and Orange Grove and goes shopping. I walk along The Loop up to the QT on Craycroft and she picks me up there,” he says.

Jennifer Brown and Sandy Ballis ride their horses along the The Loop as it runs along the Rillito River

In addition to luring tourists and locals, The Loop has played a significant role in the art community, as well as the success of local shops, restaurants and farmers markets. For Jessie and David Zugerman, owners of Tucson Hop Shop, locating the brewery in the Metal Arts Village near the path was a no-brainer. “We knew the cyclists would be a huge target demographic for our business,” says Jessie. “Proximity to this major cycling artery was a cornerstone in finding a location.” The pair feels lucky to have found a spot less than a mile from The Loop entrance at Dodge Boulevard.

The Rillito Farmers Market is another business that has benefitted. Although many market shoppers still arrive by car, The Loop provides safe passage for those who wish to bike there. Numerous visitors to the market make a spontaneous stop because they spot the market while biking or walking.

After picking up some local goodies from the Rillito Farmers Market and grabbing a brew from Tucson Hop Shop, “loopers” can take in the spectacle of more than 90 pieces of public art located along the river park paths. Some are obvious, even dramatic, statements designed to reflect the character of the location or enhance a neighborhood’s distinctive identity. Others are more subtle and serve to complement the appearance of more functional features of the linear park such as bridges, noise walls, railings and benches.

Artist Stephen Fairfield submitted the first of his popular “Batty Biker” sculptures in response to a request for concepts incorporating bats, bikes and bridges. “Pima County sought to have sculptures along The Loop where people would go to see the roosting bats fly out at dusk to feed, and come back at dawn to rest up. They also wanted the sculptures relevant to passersby on bicycles,” Fairfield explains. “I kind of have a cracked sense of humor and it isn’t hard for me to find whimsy in everyday things, hence the bat and the bike series.”

Whether you’re using it for restaurant hopping, vegetable shopping, or just enjoying the great outdoors, there’s still one question that may be circling your mind: is The Loop complete? The answer is, yes — but it’s not finished. Future projects to make it bigger and better are already in the planning stages, including improved river park pathways in certain areas, as well as adding sections in Marana and Oro Valley. The county will widen paths in some places and increase native vegetation in others. Look for more improvements and path extensions over the next decade. TL

Editorial Note: Thanks to Pima County Attractions and Tourism for providing information and photos for this article.

Making the Grade

One local couple and their team of landscape professionals found exciting ways to handle the elevation changes in their backyard.

By Megan Guthrie  |  Photography by Robin Stancliff

Lush plantings cascade down toward the pool.

When Steve and Laurel Brown set out to purchase their second home in 2009, they wanted an outdoor living experience. Looking at the canyon views surrounding their northside property, it is no surprise that their Midwestern friends and family are frequent guests to this Tucson abode — a property made for entertaining.

“People are truly blown away when they see the environment,” says Laurel. “Everyone says it feels like a private five-star resort.”

The property was so spectacular that Laurel’s brother held his wedding there. The elegant event surpassed many guests’ expectations. “We have hosted a few community organization fundraisers and parties, as well,” says Laurel.

The backyard wasn’t always this grand. Starting with a small patio area, overgrown landscaping, lack of shade, dirt slopes, and a pool and spa area in need of being reconfigured, Steve and Laurel knew they were embarking on a major landscape design project. “It looked like a big missed opportunity the way it was,” Laurel says. “All I thought about was changing it all!”

Magnificent mountain and desert views can be enjoyed from the home’s upper patios.

The couple enlisted the expertise of Michael Byrne, PLA, ASLA, Project Landscape Architect and co-owner of The WLB Group after being introduced by Anne Ferro and Bryan Durkin, real estate agents from Sotheby’s International Realty. “Michael presented ideas that were larger and more exciting than I originally visualized,” Laurel says.

Byrne, an expert in structural issues such as retaining walls and hardscape elements like steps, walls and building design, was interested in finding solutions to the grade changes throughout the original yard. Tens of thousands of yards of dirt were added to the property. Terraces were built, connected by steps, ramps and stairs to address the changes in elevation throughout the landscape.

Extending the interior design elements to the outdoors was integral to the overall design. Wooden planks were used for the flooring inside the house, so Laurel chose wood-look plank tiles in a pattern that intersected with stone. The interior and exterior flooring now appears to be continuous. This stone tile is one of many materials chosen for its durability and visual appeal.

“We wanted classic stone — something that would not look out of fashion in a few years,” Laurel says. “I selected materials that spoke to the colors and materials of the area. I wanted desert colors, and typical materials used in Arizona.”

As the owner of Brownhouse Design, an architecture and interior design firm, Laurel has an eye for aesthetics. Her favorite spot in the yard is the approximately 600-square-foot, newly constructed casita. For the roof, wooden beams from Wisconsin were selected (the same beams were used in the main house). Several reclaimed wooden pillars from the Middle East were placed at the entrance of the casita. Seven tin star chandeliers hang from the ceiling, inspired by light fixtures Laurel saw on a trip to Tubac. The casita features an outdoor kitchen, with a leather finish on the granite countertop and custom wooden cabinets. Six sconces, inlaid with semiprecious stones from Santa Fe, hang on the walls. The flooring is vein-cut travertine. A large wood-burning fireplace is situated next to an enclave holding stacks of mesquite firewood. Within this space, a built-in banco offers additional seating.

Décor elements include leather-finish granite countertops, custom cabinets, metal sconces, reclaimed wood doors and pillars from the Middle East.

“I love the wood-burning fireplace,” Laurel says. “We burn mesquite and love the aroma.”

Forms and geometry were thoughtfully considered for the residence. The pool and spa were reconfigured to display curved edges to complement the circular patterns found in the flooring, and the curved terraces above. There is a grade difference of approximately four feet between the terrace and the pool. A reconfigured water feature connects the pool and spa. Above the pool sits a metal fire urn with a gas jet center. When turned on at night, this showstopper casts a warm glow.

“A site that is more open and surrounded by nature, such as the Brown residence, calls for simple forms for which the surrounding natural world acts as a backdrop,” Byrne says. “The terraces and the pool seem almost to be jewels within an elaborate setting of very dramatic views.”

The vistas include an unobstructed view of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Within the yard, two saguaros were planted to add visual interest. Rosemary, lantana, plumbago, bougainvillea and Sprenger’s asparagus fill raised planters and cascade down the sides of walls.

There are six seating areas located on various terraces. A stainless steel outdoor barbecue and fountain provide a space to grill while listening to the soothing sound of flowing water.

To construct a level surface for socializing and circulation, drains were installed on the terraces. Additionally, planter walls constructed using split-face block define the elevation changes. Down lighting and step lighting fixtures illuminate the stairs, ramps and terraces during evening walks. The design process took six months, with construction requiring about a year due to the high level of site work in a hard-to-access space.

By the comments from both the homeowners and their visitors, it was time and money well spent.

“My midwestern friends and family cannot wait to put on shorts and get in a lounge chair by the side of our pool,” Laurel says. “We love gathering in the casita on the cool nights with a raging fire going. We are able to talk and share in a way we couldn’t do in a different type of space.”

Sources:

Michael Byrne, PLA, ASLA | The WLB Group, www.wlbgroup.com

Brownhouse Design | www.brownhousedesign.com 

Teaming with Talent

If you’re new to town, you may not realize that along with events involving the UA Wildcats, there are other athletic competitions taking place here — even on ice! Meet three local, professional sports teams, whose young players have their eyes on moving up to competing on a national level.

By Betsy Bruce

TUCSON SAGUAROS

Though the exact origins of baseball are unknown, it can be traced back to 18th century England. It’s safe to say that the early practitioners of bat-and-ball contests wouldn’t recognize a modern game. But baseball has become iconic in America, as well as loved in countries such as Japan, Cuba and South Korea.

The players of the Pecos League’s Tucson Saguaros, all just cracking their 20s, play for the love of the game. Their manager, 72-year-old Bill Moore, has been involved in independent league baseball for almost half a century. Moore identifies the 1988 Kevin Costner film Bull Durham as his favorite baseball movie because, “It is the most realistic portrait of minor league baseball ever.” If you wonder what he thinks of toiling outside the spotlights of “the Show,” his comment on his career is: “In the big department store of the universe, I work in the toys department … great job.”

Tucson Saguaros photos by Laurie Lefebvre pecosleaguephotos.com

Home base for the Saguaros right now is TUSD’s Cherry Field and the team’s roster is composed of plucky young men, most fresh from college, who aspire to play in “the bigs.” Indeed Moore has managed an amazing 28 players who’ve made it to the major leagues, including Paul Konerko, captain of the 2005 World Series Champion Chicago White Sox and Andre Ethier, the Dodgers’ all-time leader in postseason appearances. “I like an aggressive bunch of guys,” says Moore. “I like to play with speed.” When the Saguaros are having fun on the field, that’s when they’re playing their best.

Pitcher Eric Morell returned to the Saguaros after a perfect 7 and 0 in 2017. The recent LaGrange College (Georgia) graduate majored in exercise science, and though he throws the heat, he says icing the arm post game isn’t necessary so he doesn’t indulge. Morrell pitches with a “bulldog mentality” and has little doubt the Saguaros are championship caliber this season. California native and leftie pitcher Ryan Baca has been playing baseball since he was two years old and says being a southpaw “makes me a little sneakier.” The 2018 marked Baca’s inaugural year playing for Moore. “I’ve heard nothing but good things about him,” says Baca. “This is a guy you can learn a lot from. Dude is awesome.”

Pecos League play starts in mid-May and, according to Moore, will end in mid-August with the Saguaro’s taking part in the League championship. First pitch for weekday home games is at 7 p.m., just when that cooling expanse of shade begins to grow. Tickets can be purchased online or at the gate. Bleachers are in place and lawn chairs are welcome. A food truck will offer burgers off the grill and cold drinks.

 

FC TUCSON

For FC Tucson Head Coach Dave Cosgrove, paradise can be found on the green quilt of soccer fields at Kino Complex North. “This is the best facility in our league and it’s why they bring in the pro teams for pre-season training,” he comments. The immaculate fields, densely carpeted, make one imagine a player might be bounced back to his feet upon falling.

Although most of the world calls the sport football, we Americans call it soccer, borrowing slang that originated in England in the 1800s. The story goes that in order to keep Rugby and the other ball game from being confused, it became known as Association Football, with students at Oxford, et al. shortening it to “soc” plus “er.”

In any case, FC stands for Football Club and it takes major skills to make the FC Tucson roster of 18 players who travel. The season runs from early May through July and the team is composed of collegiate stars and newly graduated players who all aim to advance to the professional leagues. Former FC Tucson players now competing in MLS (Major League Soccer) include Aaron Long, a defender for the New York Red Bulls; Aaron Herrera, Real Salt Lake forward; and the 2016 Collegiate Player of the Year Jon Bakero, a forward for the Chicago Fire. “Tucson,” says Cosgrove, who also is the soccer coach for Pima Community College, “is a terrific soccer city.”

FC Tucson photos by Michael Benson FCTucson.com

The North Stadium at Kino Sport Complex, just across from Kino Veterans Memorial Stadium on Ajo Way, affords covered seating for 1,800 fans. Games start at 7:30 p.m. and tickets can be purchased online and at the gate. The season runs from May through July (longer with championship play). Grilled burgers, hot dogs, nachos and popcorn are served, as well as ice-cold beverages.

In its six years of existence, FC Tucson has had unprecedented success, winning division titles five of those seasons. Under new ownership, the future looks brighter still. Phoenix Rising, the Phoenix-based team aspiring to become an MLS franchise, purchased the team last year, adding cachet and resources. FC Tucson will advance to the professional ULS (United League Soccer) within the next two years. “We play with a lot of energy and enthusiasm,” says Cosgrove. “Fans can expect a total soccer experience.” FC Tucson soccer is relentless and artistic, and when you go, expect to see nose-to-the-pitch, infinitely conditioned athletes working the soft leather ball with feet as articulate as hands doing sign language. And that sign, more often than not, is victory.

Editor’s note: The FC Tucson women’s team recently won the Pac South Conference Championship.

 

TUCSON ROADRUNNERS

For the last two years there has been a new weather phenomenon in the desert Southwest. October though May, it’s been snowing inside the Tucson Convention Center. Throwing up rooster tails of fresh, fine ice (know in the game as “snow”) are a group of 28 supremely padded, hockey-stick-wielding buddies called the Tucson Roadrunners. They may be the “farm team” for the National

Tucson Roadrunners photos by Kate Dibildox Photography.

Hockey League’s Arizona Coyotes (most under contract to the ’Yotes and many called up), but they are so much more than that. They are Tucson — unique, spirited and determined.

The charming “Coyotes and Roadrunners” reference is indeed an homage to the classic Warner Bros. cartoon. “Meep Meep” sounds after the clamor of each Roadrunner goal at the TCC.

Last season’s captain Andrew Campbell hails from Caledonia, Ontario. Tall at 6’3” he rises to 6’6” on blades. Campbell credits chemistry in part for the team’s success. “We have a lot of fun on the ice and outside the rink. It’s a great group of guys.” One of three goalies for the team, 22-year-old Minnesotan Hunter Miska, says he savors the pressure of the position — the last line of defense. His artist father has custom air-brushed the masks of some of the most famous NHL goalies, including Evgeni Nabokov and Miikka Kiprusoff. It’s the one concession to individualism allowed on the ice. Miska’s mask, painted by his father, is adorned with the state of Arizona with a rising sun and mountains on one side, and the Coyotes’ logo on the other, willing his son to someday defend the crease against the very best.

The Stanley Cup of the Roadrunners’ AHL (American Hockey League) is the Calder Cup and in May 2018 the team made it as far as the Pacific Division Final. “We are young and fast,” Miska says.” We outwork other teams.” The thousands of fans who cheer on the Roadrunners are “passionate and rowdy,” pounding the Plexiglass, clanging purple cowbells and snacking on mini doughnuts fresh from a concessioner’s sizzling deep fryer.

The weather calls for snow again this October inside the TCC, and one lucky fan will be chosen to gather it. A second seat has been added atop the Zamboni, the backyard shed-sized machine that snakes around the rink, collecting snow, dispensing fresh water and erasing the scars of the last quarter. Rink-side tickets can be had for $40 to $50, but there is always a seat for just around $10. The Roadrunner 2018-19 season starts in October, and tickets will go on sale this summer. TL

For more information on these three teams, visit www.saguarosbaseball.com; www.fctucson.com; or www.tucsonroadrunners.com.

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Tucson Lifestyle Magazine is the Tucson's only glossy, monthly city magazine, targeting Southern Arizona’s affluent residents. With over 35 years of publishing experience, Tucson Lifestyle is committed to highlighting the people, places, cuisine, and attractions that make our city unique.

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Tucson, AZ 85715

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