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August Garden Calendar

Monsoon rains help quench the thirst of summer plants.

Santa Rita

PLANTING

Plant native and low-water-use species now, when summer rains make digging easier.

Plant palms, whose root systems thrive when planted in the heat.

Plant bougainvillea, yellow bells, oleanders, acacias, cassias, mesquites and palo verdes.

PRUNING

Prune back any surviving tomato plants.

Deadhead bedding flowers.

Vincas that wilt but do not recover with a deep watering should be discarded.

HARVESTING

Pick okra and squash regularly to keep plants producing until frost.

Dinner Plate

FERTILIZING

Fertilize citrus toward the end of the month.

Avoid fertilizing frost-tender shrubs now, as this will encourage new growth that may freeze later.

Look for plants with chlorosis — yellow leaves and green veins. Treat plants with an application of chelated iron.

Give roses a late-summer application of specially formulated rose food.

WATERING

Water citrus deeply once a week or more. Too much water can result in chlorosis.

Water summer-blooming flowers and shrubs.

Water large, established cacti and succulents every 5 weeks if rains have been scarce.

Small specimens benefit from watering every 3-4 weeks.

Ocotillo canes cover themselves with green leaves during the monsoon season. Adding extra watering in between storms can stimulate new growth.

Cow’s Tongue

BLOOMING

Red bird of paradise produces showy clusters of brilliant red and orange blossoms until frost. The fern-like foliage adds a tropical look to desert gardens.

TRANSPLANTING

Set out transplants of basil, chives, lemon verbena and nasturtiums.

TIP OF THE MONTH

Engelmann prickly pear cactus (Opuntia engelmannii) easily are identified by their broad, flat green pads and vivid yellow or red-orange blooms. Both drought- and coldtolerant, they can reach five feet tall, and grow to a width of 10-15 feet.

There are more than 18 species of prickly pear in several shapes and sizes. All are known for their sculptural form — series of flat pads connected by joints. They provide shelter and a food source for native birds, insects and mammals.

When they reach an unwieldy size, the pads can be transplanted. Use caution and wear thick gloves, as the pads are covered with tiny, barbed hairs. Use a sharp knife to remove a pad from the end of a jointed segment. Let the cut end dry for a few days. Bury the lower 1/3 of the pad in an upright position. Prop up with soil or rocks. Water until roots appear, then back off on the watering — you don’t want root rot!

Live help

Happy 244th Old Pueblo!

You won’t want to miss these official events that celebrate our city’s birthday.

 

Tucson Presidio Birthday

Celebrate the 244th anniversary of the founding of the Tucson Presidio at the Southern Arizona Transportation Museum. Enjoy a mayoral proclamation, mariachi music, Chinese Lion Dance, an appearance by the Greater Southern Arizona Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers, and classic Mexican and American folk music by Ted Ramirez. Ramirez, a Tucson native, is a direct descendent of the region’s first Spanish families, and was Tucson’s official troubadour in 2001. After the event, stop by the railroad art exhibits next door in the Amtrak lobby, and don’t miss the menu at Maynards Market & Kitchen. Noon-4 pm. 623-2223 http://tucsonhistoricdepot.org.

             

 

 

Tucson’s Birthday Celebration

The Presidio San Agustín del Tucson Museum is a re-creation of the presidio built in 1775. See the archaeological remains of a pit house, walk along the original presidio wall and experience a 150-year-old classic Sonoran row house. During this event, the Presidio Museum will honor the Old Pueblo’s birthday with cake, a happy hour, taco bar and live performances at La Cocina (located in nearby Old Town Artisans). Ongoing free docent tours of the museum, as well as tours of the presidio district with Ken Scoville. 5 pm. 196 N. Court Ave. 837-8119. https://tucsonpresidio.com.

Historical re-creations and other activities will take place at the Presidio San Agustín del Tucson and nearby at La Cocina. Photos by James Patrick Photography.

       

Live help

Summer in Scottsdale

WITH SO MANY REASONS TO VISIT THE Scottsdale/Phoenix area this summer, it can be difficult to pin down an itinerary. We have a few suggestions for things to see and do in the Valley of the Sun.

From the Editors

Proper eyewear is a must in the desert! Protecting your vision from damaging rays is something you need to be vigilant about, and at the same time, you want to be stylish as well as safe. Framed Ewe Optical is like no other optical shop you may have been to. Their designer frames (for everything from non-prescription sunglasses, to readers, to prescription lenses), are curated and uncommon, and they’ll certainly set you apart from the crowd. Check out frames from Lindberg, Andy Wolf, KREWE and lots of other hip purveyors. Their Phoenix shop is at The Colony on North 7th Street.

You’ll also need an amazing ensemble or two to go with your new shades, and for that, head for the Lincoln Village (Scottsdale) location of My Sister’s Closet. This upscale resale shop has a large selection of gently used clothes from lines like Prada, Chanel, Givenchy and Dolce & Gabbana. When you first walk in, you’ll be met by displays of shoes and accessories from well-known labels such as Lacroix, Christian Louboutin and Manolo Blahnik.

FELLOW OSTERIA.
Photo courtesy of MMPR Marketing,

You can trade, sell, buy, and leave the shop with the perfect wardrobe for your Valley vaycay. Well-heeled and hungry, a great dinner stop for you would be Fellow Osteria, a new Scottsdale restaurant that offers attentive and friendly service, inventive cocktails and sensational wines, and a satisfying menu of finely created, Italian-inspired dishes that are the perfect nosh. In Italy, an osteria offers small plates of simple food that are satisfying but not over-stuffing. Fellow delights your taste buds with pasta dishes such as cacio e pepe; pizzas with toppings like Crow’s Dairy goat cheese fonduta, radicchio, caramelized onion and balsamic honey; and irresistible cannolis that are made fresh in-house.

For your Valley stay, you’ll want a place that offers more than just a room, and there are many stellar options from which to pick. Newly renovated, The Scott Resort & Spa has adopted an old Havana vibe and has all the amenities you’d want, including two outdoor pools, La Vidorra Spa, and the Canal Club, a Caribbean-inspired restaurant.

In neighboring Paradise Valley sits Mountain Shadows, a tranquil oasis that melds mid-century modern design and 21st century service. The property features the award-winning Hearth ’61 restaurant, a workout facility, par-3/18-hole golf course, two pools and a hot tub, along with some of the most gorgeous vistas you’ll find in the Grand Canyon State. Be sure to check out not only the rotating contemporary artwork on display, but also the collection of vintage photos from the very first incarnation of the hotel (you’ll spot some famous faces in the mix).

HOTEL VALLEY HO, PUBLIC ART TOUR. Photo courtesy of Hotel Valley Ho.

The sister property, Hotel Valley Ho, is a short drive away, and redefines retro in its rooms, lobby and restaurant. You’ll feel a

little like you’re entering Disneyland in the early 1960s, and for sure, this place is E-ticket-ride fun. Drop in for lunch at the hotel’s ZuZu restaurant and turn back the clock with a patty melt, or try a vegetarian Impossible Burger, and in either case, be sure to order the onion rings!

About a 20-or-so-minute drive takes you to the Phoenix Art Museum, where the Ellman Fashion Design Gallery and Lewis Gallery are displaying the Flora through Aug. 18. Many top designers and fashion houses are part of this exhibit, which traces how flowers have influenced clothing design from the 18th century to the modern runway.

Much to Do … In San Diego!

THROUGHOUT 2019, SAN DIEGO CELEBRATES ITS FOUNDING 250 YEARS AGO as the first settlement of Alta California. Old Town San Diego, which was the original location of the mission and the presidio that started it all, will be the site of various events, including a Founder’s Day Festival, September 14-15.

From the Editors

Petco Park in downtown San Diego. Photo courtesy of San Diego Padres.

Fast forward 200 years from the city’s start, and you wind up in 1969, the year that MLB’s San Diego Padres first took the field. Petco Park, in the heart of downtown, will host games including special promotions all during July, August and September in the run-up to the Fall Classic.

Cosplayers at San Diego Comic-Con. Photo courtesy of San Diego Tourism Authority.

Fans of comic books, movies, and other areas of pop culture will be drawn to the San Diego Convention Center July 18-21 for the 50th annual Comic-Con. What began as a gathering of a small group of collectors has grown over the years to become a major event for film studios to promote their projects, especially those in the fantasy and science fiction fields.

Parade Crowd Flag displayed
at Pride Weekend. Photo courtesy of San Diego Pride.

July also is the month for San Diego Pride Weekend (July 13-15), an event that includes everything from a Spirit of Stonewall Rally, to a Pride of Hillcrest Block Party, to a 5k race, as well as live performances from big-name musical groups and entertainers.

LEGOLAND, site of Red, White and BOOM!
Photo courtesy of LEGOLAND Resort California

You would expect a community with such a vibrant cultural life to have an amazing Fourth of July celebration, and San Diego doesn’t disappoint, with several taking place in the immediate area. The Port of San Diego holds the largest fireworks show in the county, titled Big Bay Boom. If you want to get a water-level view of it, the Maritime Museum, Hornblower and Flagship all offer cruises that will afford spectacular views of the show. Coronado stages not only a parade that lasts a full two hours, but also a family concert in Spreckels Park and fireworks over Glorietta Bay. Up the road in Carlsbad, families can enjoy a variety of activities, including pyrotechnics during “Red, White and BOOM!”

For more information, go to www.sandiego.org.

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About Us

Tucson Lifestyle Magazine is Tucson's only glossy, monthly city magazine, targeting Southern Arizona’s affluent residents. With over 35 years of publishing experience, Tucson Lifestyle is committed to showcasing the people, places, local flavors, and attractions that make our city unique.

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Tucson, AZ 85715

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