Author: Daniela Siqueiros

August Garden Calendar

Monsoon rains help quench the thirst of summer plants.

Santa Rita

PLANTING

Plant native and low-water-use species now, when summer rains make digging easier.

Plant palms, whose root systems thrive when planted in the heat.

Plant bougainvillea, yellow bells, oleanders, acacias, cassias, mesquites and palo verdes.

PRUNING

Prune back any surviving tomato plants.

Deadhead bedding flowers.

Vincas that wilt but do not recover with a deep watering should be discarded.

HARVESTING

Pick okra and squash regularly to keep plants producing until frost.

Dinner Plate

FERTILIZING

Fertilize citrus toward the end of the month.

Avoid fertilizing frost-tender shrubs now, as this will encourage new growth that may freeze later.

Look for plants with chlorosis — yellow leaves and green veins. Treat plants with an application of chelated iron.

Give roses a late-summer application of specially formulated rose food.

WATERING

Water citrus deeply once a week or more. Too much water can result in chlorosis.

Water summer-blooming flowers and shrubs.

Water large, established cacti and succulents every 5 weeks if rains have been scarce.

Small specimens benefit from watering every 3-4 weeks.

Ocotillo canes cover themselves with green leaves during the monsoon season. Adding extra watering in between storms can stimulate new growth.

Cow’s Tongue

BLOOMING

Red bird of paradise produces showy clusters of brilliant red and orange blossoms until frost. The fern-like foliage adds a tropical look to desert gardens.

TRANSPLANTING

Set out transplants of basil, chives, lemon verbena and nasturtiums.

TIP OF THE MONTH

Engelmann prickly pear cactus (Opuntia engelmannii) easily are identified by their broad, flat green pads and vivid yellow or red-orange blooms. Both drought- and coldtolerant, they can reach five feet tall, and grow to a width of 10-15 feet.

There are more than 18 species of prickly pear in several shapes and sizes. All are known for their sculptural form — series of flat pads connected by joints. They provide shelter and a food source for native birds, insects and mammals.

When they reach an unwieldy size, the pads can be transplanted. Use caution and wear thick gloves, as the pads are covered with tiny, barbed hairs. Use a sharp knife to remove a pad from the end of a jointed segment. Let the cut end dry for a few days. Bury the lower 1/3 of the pad in an upright position. Prop up with soil or rocks. Water until roots appear, then back off on the watering — you don’t want root rot!

Live help

Happy 244th Old Pueblo!

You won’t want to miss these official events that celebrate our city’s birthday.

 

Tucson Presidio Birthday

Celebrate the 244th anniversary of the founding of the Tucson Presidio at the Southern Arizona Transportation Museum. Enjoy a mayoral proclamation, mariachi music, Chinese Lion Dance, an appearance by the Greater Southern Arizona Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers, and classic Mexican and American folk music by Ted Ramirez. Ramirez, a Tucson native, is a direct descendent of the region’s first Spanish families, and was Tucson’s official troubadour in 2001. After the event, stop by the railroad art exhibits next door in the Amtrak lobby, and don’t miss the menu at Maynards Market & Kitchen. Noon-4 pm. 623-2223 http://tucsonhistoricdepot.org.

             

 

 

Tucson’s Birthday Celebration

The Presidio San Agustín del Tucson Museum is a re-creation of the presidio built in 1775. See the archaeological remains of a pit house, walk along the original presidio wall and experience a 150-year-old classic Sonoran row house. During this event, the Presidio Museum will honor the Old Pueblo’s birthday with cake, a happy hour, taco bar and live performances at La Cocina (located in nearby Old Town Artisans). Ongoing free docent tours of the museum, as well as tours of the presidio district with Ken Scoville. 5 pm. 196 N. Court Ave. 837-8119. https://tucsonpresidio.com.

Historical re-creations and other activities will take place at the Presidio San Agustín del Tucson and nearby at La Cocina. Photos by James Patrick Photography.

       

Live help

The Hole Story

By Kimberly Schmitz

Photography by Tom Spitz

Though National Donut Day was celebrated last month, nearly any day is perfect for indulging in these iconic pastries. Here are six locally owned shops that will make your eyes glaze over!

Irene’s Holy Donuts

Carla Elenes at Irene’s Holy Donuts holds up the giant Homer Simpson donut.

A trans-Pacific family owned franchise, Irene’s Holy Donuts is a recent addition to Tucson’s donut scene. Irene and Steve Heiman opened the original location in Kona, Hawaii in 2015. Irene, a former Realtor, sought another path — and received a divine directive. After formulating recipes in her home kitchen and testing them on neighbors, she opened the doors to her calling, making amazing donuts an

More than 300 taste-bud-blowing flavors of donuts rotate on and off the daily menu.

d changing lives. Through the shop she offered second chances to homeless and “forgotten” youth in the Kona Community. Compelled to retire off-island, the couple landed in Tucson and opened a second Holy Donuts on Fourth Avenue. More than 300taste-bud-blowing flavors of donuts rotate on and off the daily menu with 60 or so available by 6:30 a.m. every day. Anything with passion fruit goes fast, but every single delectable donut (approximately 2,000), including to-die-for traditional glazed, horchata, and even a key lime margarita flavor, is sold out every day. After 8:30 a.m. savory Hawaiian delights like beef and chicken skewers, spam and eggs Musubi, and Loco Moco are available for the hip and hungry. Don’t expect things to slow down after sunset at Irene’s. Adjacent to the shop is the Donut Hole, a lively hotspot serving donuts and drinks with a steady menu of local entertainment from open mike to Reggae, and Indie to rock sounds. The Hole is open until 2:30 a.m. weekend nights. Is it a donut shop or a donut-themed nightclub? Who cares? It’s amazing and definitely a one-of-a-kind spot worth a visit.

340 N. 4th Ave.; Facebook.com/HolyDonutsTucson

Le Cave’s Bakery

Each day, thousands of original recipe donuts, empanadas, fruit pies, cookies and cakes are served to locals and visitors from as far away as Australia.

With a new look, location and ownership, this long-time Tucson favorite continues to serve up its iconic, internationally craved donuts and pastries. The bakery’s doors first opened in 1935 and last year it changed hands. New owners and native Tucsonans Naomi and Chris Pershing had more connection with Le Cave’s than originally thought. Not only did the uncle of their new operations manager bake at the original site, but Naomi’s grandmother stopped in regularly with schoolmates from Nogales! Per Grandma’s direct orders, the Pershings won’t change a single ingredient in any of Le Cave’s amazing offerings. Each day, thousands of original recipe donuts, empanadas, fruit pies, cookies and cakes are served to locals and vi

sitors from as far away as Australia. Although the Pershings — former chocolatiers — favor chocolate whipped cream and chocolate frosted donuts, the original frosted, chocolate- glazed and maple-glazed donuts are customer favorites. The popularity of these sweet, centerless wonders, however, is closely rivaled by that of the cherry, pineapple or pumpkin empanadas, or generous slices of Le Cave’s iconic tres leches cake. A cadre of regulars boasts 30- and 40-year traditions of celebrating birthdays with Le Cave’s cakes! Specialty cakes can be ordered 24 to 48 hours in advance or a freshly baked “stock” cake may be personalized on the spot. There’s no special occasion required to experience what aficionados from Mexico to Canada and Australia to Germany are raving about from this 84-year-strong Tucson sweet treat staple.

3950 E. 22nd St.; 624-2561; LeCaves.com

La Estrella Bakery

La Estrella Bakery is a traditional panaderia so authentic it seems to have been plucked from south of the border and planted in South Tucson. It’s had a strong 33-year run with no signs of slowing. Antonio and Martha Franco established a new/old tradition when they opened shop in 1986. Reminiscent of the bakeries that were center points of Mexican communities in eras past, this Old Pueblo favorite also is a bonafide star — the subject of the 2012 documentary Dulce Tucson (Sweet Tucson). Maybe the fanfare drew newcomers, but the phenomenal baked goods and ambrosial menudo brings them back. Certainly, one of the few benefits of being an adult is reaching for the sugar before the spice. So we gravitate toward the temptingly sweet and perfectly prepared donuts at La Estrella. Twists, glazed, and bear claws, oh my! Fruit-filled, long Johns, the list goes on but there’s so much more. Churros, elotes, cookies and sweet-filled chimis round out the offerings. If you’re on a pilgrimage for something sugary, you may feel as if you’ve found the holy grail here, and even stumbled into paradise with an order of La Estrella’s pan de leche (Mexican sweet bread). Both locations boast a steady stream of regulars from near and far. It’s an iconic Tucson bakery for some, a regular household goods stop for others, and a community center for many. Stop in to grab a bite, then return for what you missed out on the first time.

5266 S. 12th Ave., 741-0645, and 120 S. Avenida del Convento, 393-3320; LaEstrellaBakeryIncAZ.com

Alvernon Donut Shop

If you’re in the mood for a bigger-than-your- face bear claw, a colossal cinnamon bun, a delectable apple fritter or just about any other donut flavor you can name, hop into the homey Alvernon Donut Shop. Baker/owner Po will chat you up when he’s not pouring his heart and hundreds of other ingredients into his doughy delights. He says he’ll go crazy if he ever tried to count how many scrumptious treats he sells in a day. But he’ll tell you all day long about his secret ingredient — love. Po was in a California carpenters union when he heard the shop was for sale. He bought it, picked up stakes and moved to Tucson more than 17 years ago. Millions of donuts later, he is still head baker, chief conversationalist, and passionate community supporter. Among many other causes, Po ardently supports the Reid Park Zoo and Gospel Rescue Mission. One dedicated, long-time customer buys three- or four-dozen apple fritters to take home to Texas for friends and family! Don’t overlook the savory options like the ham, cheese and jalapeño croissants or the jalapeño poppers with cream cheese and bacon. Po takes his offerings very seriously and prides himself on the freshness and authenticity of every bite. It’s rumored that Alvernon Donuts also offers the best service in the biz. Hours are roughly 5 a.m. to 3 p.m.

1450 S. Alvernon Way; 326-3307

Donut King

Let’s solve the debate here. It’s Donut King. As explained by the current owner Paul Tith, it used to be King Donut, but when it changed hands in 2006, it became Donut King. Paul managed Donut King for years and just recently took over ownership. He served in the Navy, became a certified aircraft mechanic, then settled into his calling. But hey, does the debate on the name really matter? It will become a distant memory as you wash down any one (or four, no judgment) of the superfluffy, tasty creations from this Tucson gem in a proudly blue-collar neighborhood. This place sports an earlier closing time. But hey, they’ve got their doors open with fresh, warm, tasty treats long before many of us are out of bed. No crazy frills here, just a dizzying array of die-hard donut fan favorites, such as maple bars, chocolate covered, glazed, sprinkles, fruit-filled — you name it. Though it’s best known for its sweets, incredible stuffed croissant sandwiches are available, as well as hot or iced coffee poured to order, or something cold from the cooler. Of the 700 donuts sold every day, the classic glazed are the first to go, so get in early to grab yours and support this family owned and operated business.

150 W. Grant Rd.; 623-7260

Young Donut Shop

From some of the best old-fashioned, glazed, and blueberry-filled to almost sinfully delightful apple fritters and the infamous braided tiger tails, these deep-fried delicacies will have you stashing donut cash for when you’re in the neighborhood

Rummage through your couch cushions or forgotten coat pockets for some cash to pick up a few (or a few dozen) donuts at this humble, eastside joint. They don’t take cards, but the airy, delicious delights are well worth the effort to pay in good old greenbacks. (There’s an ATM inside if you forget.) Young’s, after all, was named the Best Donut Shop in Arizona by media website Thrillist a few years ago. Undaunted by the glory, for nearly a decade sibling team Sophy and Keng Se begins baking before the rooster even considers making a peep, day in and day out to provide donuts to the masses. From some of the best old-fashioned, glazed, and blueberry-filled to almost sinfully delightful apple fritters and the infamous braided tiger tails, these deep-fried delicacies will have you stashing donut cash for when you’re in the neighborhood. Get here early for the best selection, and if you’re travelling from a distance, call ahead. This is a family run shop that closes for holidays. Young’s is known for offering service with a smile and often a little extra something to fill in the blank space in a box or bag. If it’s not your turn for a freebie, rest assured that you won’t be disappointed. The prices are so reasonable you’ll likely buy more than you’d dare to eat in a sitting anyway. Amazing assortment, friendly service, sweet surprises — if that’s not bang for your buck, we don’t know what is!

1043 N. Kolb Rd.; 298-0020

What kind of home could you buy here if you had $3-5 million to spend? We have the answers!

6799 N. Rattlesnake Canyon Road
$5,900,000
5 bedrooms
7 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 9,003
Acres: 49
Year built: 2000

Villa Esperero includes a 9,000-square-foot main house with two master suites, three additional guest suites, two additional bathrooms and a library. Mesquite hardwood floors, natural stone, flagstone and marble finishes. Multiple patios, terraces and balconies overlook the valley and mountain ranges. Gourmet kitchen, well-equipped butler’s pantry and formal dining room. Backyard includes a wraparound covered patio with outdoor kitchen and dining area and infinity-edge pool and spa.

Listing agent: Judy Smedes & Kate Herk Real Estate Group with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty Photos by Audra White/Images by Audra; Courtesy of Judy Smedes & Kate Herk Real Estate Group


7406 N. Secret Canyon Drive
$3,895,000
4 bedrooms
4 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 8,327
Acres: 1.97
Year built: 1999

A hilltop Mediterranean located in the premier gated community The Canyons, this residence features a gracious soaring entry and separate reception area. There is a gallery space on both sides of the formal entry designed for art display and large-scale entertaining, as well as seated dining that can host 30-35 guests. Beautifully appointed mirror-image formal living and dining rooms flank the reception area and look out to the terrace, pool and city lights. Both rooms have carved stone gas fireplaces.

Listing agent: Judy Smedes & Kate Herk Real Estate Group with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty Images courtesy of Judy Smedes & Kate Herk Real Estate Group


8535 E. Shadow Side Place
$4,000,000
6 bedrooms
7 bathrooms
Square footage: 5,402
Acres: .77
Year built: 1997

Mediterranean and Southwest architecture blend in this fully furnished sanctuary adjacent to Canyon Ranch Wellness Resort. Great Room with breathtaking views of both the Catalina and Rincon Mountains. Every room has its own full master bathroom with access to patio decks. Three bedrooms on each level, separate chef’squality kitchen with granite counters and a large island, as well as access to the outside deck and barbecue. Large, well-equipped laundry room includes a linen presser.

Listing agent: Edgar Yacob with Long Realty Company Photos by Daniel Snyder, courtesy of Long Realty Company


7582 N. Secret Canyon Drive
$3,900,000
6 bedroom
6 full baths
4 half baths
Square footage: 13,350
Acres: 1.36
Year built: 2009

Located on a private lot with views of city lights and mountain ranges, the home includes many European antique finishes, such as fireplace mantels and surrounds, chandeliers, gold leaf crown molding and custom carpets. Formal living and dining rooms, butler’s kitchen and show kitchen, family room, den, nursery, English pub, 15-seat movie theater, three guest suites, exercise room, massage room, and an auto gallery with turntable for 15 cars. Pool, spa and an outdoor kitchen with pizza oven.

Listing agents: Janell Jellison and Paula Williams with Long Realty Company Images courtesy of Long Realty Company


11601 E. Lusitano Place
$3,900,000
6 bedrooms
5 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 8,753
Acres: 3.31
Year built: 2001

Spanish/Mediterranean home in Wild Horse Ranch Estates with mountain views. The eat-in kitchen includes a large island, family size table, Sub-Zero refrigerator and six-burner gas cooktop with custom vent hood. Master suite has a gas fireplace, private patio, and a built-in entertainment center. Master bathroom has separate vanities, steam shower and jetted tub. There are two pools, including an indoor one with resistance jets. Attached two-bedroom guesthouse. There also is a detached, 12-vehicle garage with an apartment.

Listing agent: Don Vallee with Long Realty Company Photos by Ron McCoy, courtesy of Long Realty Company


3868 N. Canyon Ranch Drive – (not shown)
$3,595,000
4 bedrooms
4 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 4,020
Acres: 0.62
Year built: 2009

A contemporary home on a view lot that backs up to Sabino Creek, the design includes walls of glass framing spectacular mountain views. Natural stone floors, wood ceilings and custom details abound. The gourmet kitchen features a mesquite butcher block island and stainless appliances, and overlooks the negative-edge pool/spa. Four lavish bedroom suites and an office make for an ideal retreat or full-time residence. This home is available furnished with some exclusions.

Listing agent: Bryan Durkin with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty


5831 E. Finisterra – (not shown)
$3,500,000
4 bedrooms
4 full baths
2 half baths
Square footage: 7,442
Acres: 1.53
Year built: 1988

This estate located in Finisterra recently underwent a two-year, multimillion-dollar renovation by the current owners who sourced materials from around the globe. The elaborate kitchen features an enormous Calcutta marble island, Wolf appliances, custom walnut cabinets, French parquet floors and an 18th century French fireplace. There are three guest suites and a master suite with city and mountain views, a spa-like bathroom, fireplace and impressive closet. The backyard includes a pool/ spa and pavilion for entertaining.

Listing agent: Bryan Durkin with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty


6801 N. Dundedin Place
$3,695,000
4 bedrooms
4 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 5,159
Acres: 1.33
Year built: 1994

Situated overlooking a golf course, and offering views of both city lights and the Santa Catalinas, this remodeled home features reclaimed oak floors with an inlay of Spanish deco tile. Modern amenities include an iPad interface automation for sound, with security and camera monitoring capabilities. The master suite has a luxurious bath with walk-in shower and private garden retreat. One additional en-suite bedroom is housed on the main level, with the remaining en-suite bedrooms on the lower level, which open on a shaded veranda.

Listing agent: The Gray/St. Onge Real Estate Group of Long Realty Company Photos courtesy of The Gray/St. Onge Real Estate Group


812 W. Granite Gorge Drive 339
$3,495,000
4 bedrooms
4 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 7,133
Acres: 1.31
Year built: 2012

The finishes in this combination Mediterranean/modern/Tuscan-style home include handcrafted distressed flooring in office together with fireplace, library, wet bar and entertainment center. Massive front door leads to a majestic foyer with a custom ceiling with cove lighting. Staircase to loft media room created from Tivoli Walnut Slab material. The temperature-controlled wine room will showcase up to 600 bottles. Multiple outdoor spaces for relaxing/entertaining, such as the pool area, outdoor fire pit and upper deck cocktail lounge.

Listing agent: Suzie Corona and Josh Waggoner with Long Realty Company Photos by Ray Albright, courtesy of Suzie Corona and Josh Waggoner


1620 W. Niner Way
$3,900,000
9 bedrooms
8 full baths
1 half bath
Square footage: 9,773
Acres: 16.01
Year built: 1992

Located in La Cholla Airpark, this residence has a spacious living room with 16-foot wood-beam-accented ceilings and window walls. Kitchen with top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances, breakfast bar and utility island with gas cook-top and vegetable sink. The master suite has two seating areas, his/her closets, lavish bathroom with gas fireplace, steam room with shower and large, jetted bathtub. Also included: a three-bedroom guesthouse, metal barn with five-horse stall and tack room, and access to a private hangar with apartment. Listing agent: Don Vallee with Long Realty Company

Photos by Colin Catron Photography, courtesy of Long Realty Company

 

Disclaimer: All information for this article has been excerpted from recent real estate listings that have been edited by Tucson Lifestyle for publication. Details for the various homes are good-faith representations and are not intended to be all-inclusive. Homes may have sold, been removed from the Multiple Listing Service, or been altered from their descriptions after press time.

July Gardening Calendar

Monsoon rains help quench the thirst of summer plants.

PLANTING

Set out heat-tolerant seasonal color blooms such as cosmos, gaillardia, gazania, globe amaranth, lisianthus, periwinkle and zinnia.

Put in warm-season vegetables such as Armenian cucumbers, black-eyes peas, corn, tepary beans, gourds, melon, okra and summer squash.

HARVESTING

Harvest basil often and prune at least 1/3 of the growth to ensure an early fall harvest. Use steel tongs to remove the juicy fruit from the prickly pear cacti.

FERTILIZING

Feed blooming plants often during the wet season with high-phosphorous fertilizer. Fertilize palms during this rainy season.

Frequent irrigation leaches nutrients, so feed with a slow-release fertilizer.

PRUNING

Prune mesquite and palo verde trees during summer. These trees heal more quickly during hot weather.

WATERING

Water deepl

y early in the morning, when it’s not raining. Soak the entire root area of trees and shrubs weekly. Adjust your irrigation as needed through the monsoon season.

Summer annuals in pots may dry out quickly, so check irrigation systems often.

SHADING

Protect container plantings from intense reflected heat and sun. Non-native cacti and succulents prefer some shade. Use 50-75 percent shade cloth over peppers and tomatoes.

TRANSPLANTING

Heat-loving tecoma shrubs such as red bird of paradise, fairy duster, Texas ranger, palms, portulaca and perennial sunflowers can be planted now.

PREPARING

Make use of the summer rains by harvesting the water. That may include building a collection system or simply using the runoff and carrying it to specific planting spaces.

Watch for insect infestation on plants. Heat- and drought-stressed plants are especially vulnerable to disease.

Watch for cochineal scale on prickly pear cacti and wash off any that appears.

Avoid standing water that might harbor mosquitoes.

TIP OF THE MONTH

Summer vegetables can become stressed from the heat this month, with wilted leaves in the morning an obvious signal. Late-afternoon wilting also may be heat stress, but as evening approaches the plants may perk up again.

To keep soil moist, water slowly and deeply. Add fertilizer to moist soil only, then add more water to move it to the roots.

Eggplant, corn, squash, beans, melons, black-eyed peas, cucumbers, peppers and okra are some of the best warm-season crops. As melons ripen, place a board beneath them to prevent insect damage.

Corn, squash and beans are known as “the three sisters,” and usually are planted together. The corn plants provide shade, the beans add nitrogen to the soil, and the squash foliage shades the ground, preventing evaporation of the monsoon rains.

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About Us

Tucson Lifestyle Magazine is Tucson's only glossy, monthly city magazine, targeting Southern Arizona’s affluent residents. With over 35 years of publishing experience, Tucson Lifestyle is committed to showcasing the people, places, local flavors, and attractions that make our city unique.

General Information

Phone: 520-721-2929 x 102
Address: 7000 E Tanque Verde Rd # 11,
Tucson, AZ 85715

Latest Posts
  • August Garden Calendar

    August Garden Calendar

    Monsoon rains help quench the thirst of summer plants. PLANTING Plant native and low-water-use species now, when summer rains make digging easier. Plant palms, whose root systems thrive when planted in the heat. Plant bougainvillea, yellow bells, oleanders, acacias, cassias, …
  • Happy 244th Old Pueblo!

    Happy 244th Old Pueblo!

    You won’t want to miss these official events that celebrate our city’s birthday.   Tucson Presidio Birthday Celebrate the 244th anniversary of the founding of the Tucson Presidio at the Southern Arizona Transportation Museum. Enjoy a mayoral proclamation, mariachi music, …
  • The Hole Story

    The Hole Story

    By Kimberly Schmitz Photography by Tom Spitz Though National Donut Day was celebrated last month, nearly any day is perfect for indulging in these iconic pastries. Here are six locally owned shops that will make your eyes glaze over! Irene’s …